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image: Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

By | September 4, 2014

A study that identified genes linked to communication between different areas of the brain has been retracted by its authors because of statistical flaws. 

2 Comments

image: Losing Languages

Losing Languages

By | September 4, 2014

Biological criteria and evolutionary models help predict threats to spoken language, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Lagoon</em>

Book Excerpt from The Lagoon

By | September 1, 2014

Author Armand Marie Leroi reminisces about the shells that sparked his love of science.

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image: Aristotelian Biology

Aristotelian Biology

By | September 1, 2014

The ancient Greek philosopher was the first scientist.

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm

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image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: TS Live: Handy Apes

TS Live: Handy Apes

By | September 1, 2014

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

4 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

0 Comments

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