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image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

20 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code

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image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

7 Comments

image: Felid Fossils

Felid Fossils

By | November 13, 2013

Paleontologists discover the oldest evidence yet suggesting that big cats originated in Asia.

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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 1, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Brave Genius</em>

Book Excerpt from Brave Genius

By | November 1, 2013

In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.

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