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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

By | June 26, 2013

A new book by an evolution historian asserts that Darwin and Wallace developed their theories of evolution independently.

1 Comment

image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

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