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image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.

6 Comments

image: Atoms and Arias

Atoms and Arias

By | March 22, 2013

A Portuguese professor explores the poisons and potions of opera.

2 Comments

image: Snobby Scientists

Snobby Scientists

By | March 21, 2013

Does the preference of many scientists to only hear talks from successful institutions limit the reach of innovation?

2 Comments

image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

4 Comments

image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

0 Comments

image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

0 Comments

image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

2 Comments

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On Being an “African-American Scientist”

Opinion: On Being an “African-American Scientist”

By | March 5, 2013

If African-American researchers are ever to gain equal opportunities in science, even subtle cases of differential treatment must be stamped out.

15 Comments

image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

0 Comments

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