The Scientist

» culture and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

0 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

By | November 17, 2014

Improved methods to grow patients’ tumor cells in a dish offer opportunities to find durable therapies.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech