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Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» culture, disease/medicine and neuroscience

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image: Growing New Neurons

Growing New Neurons

By | October 4, 2012

Brain cells called pericytes can be reprogrammed into neurons with just two proteins, pointing to a novel way to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

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image: Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers find that a deadly bacterial disease hitchhikes in people infected with the virus that causes AIDS to spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

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image: Novel Deadly Virus

Novel Deadly Virus

By | October 1, 2012

A new rhabdovirus may be responsible for an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever.

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image: The Best of the 2012 Labbies

The Best of the 2012 Labbies

By | October 1, 2012

Check out image finalists and winners, as well as other memorable submissions to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Living Color</em>

Book Excerpt from Living Color

By | October 1, 2012

In Chapter 3, "Out of the Tropics," author Nina G. Jablonski, explores the genes behind skin pigmentation and makes the distinction between color and race.

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image: Sex Matters

Sex Matters

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers reveal a new pathway of synaptic modulation in the hippocampus exclusive to females.

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image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

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image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

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image: Pixel Perfect

Pixel Perfect

By | October 1, 2012

Presenting the best life science images and videos of 2012

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image: True Colors

True Colors

By | October 1, 2012

The biological and social ramifications of skin pigmentation are too often ignored by scientists, teachers, and the general public.

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