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image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Cosmic Apprentice</em>

Book Excerpt from Cosmic Apprentice

By | August 1, 2013

In Chapter 9, “Life Gave Earth the Blues,” author Dorion Sagan addresses the planet’s exuberant color palette, evoking the contribution of industrious microbes.

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image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | August 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

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image: Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

By | August 1, 2013

Humans continue to scan the cosmos for a familiar brand of intelligence while ignoring a deeper form that pulses here at home.

9 Comments

image: Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

By | August 1, 2013

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon. Age: 41

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2013

August 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

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image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

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