The Scientist

» culture, disease/medicine and evolution

Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

0 Comments

image: Picking Up the Pace

Picking Up the Pace

By | January 1, 2016

FDA designations promise to expedite the approval of drugs for conditions ranging from infectious disease to cancer.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

1 Comment

image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

0 Comments

image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.

11 Comments

image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

0 Comments

image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

0 Comments

image: Second Contagious Cancer Found in Tasmanian Devils

Second Contagious Cancer Found in Tasmanian Devils

By | December 29, 2015

A second fatal, transmissible cancer has been identified in the already endangered species.  

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun
  4. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

Advertisement
Bertin Technologies
Bertin Technologies
Advertisement
Life Technologies