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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Redesigning Life</em>

Book Excerpt from Redesigning Life

By | December 1, 2016

In Chapter 8, author John Parrington explores the intersection of precision genome editing and stem cell technologies.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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