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image: Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

By | October 12, 2016

In the DNA of the WO phage, which infects arthropod-inhabiting Wolbachia, researchers find sequences related to a black widow spider’s toxin and other animal genes.


Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.


image: Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

By | October 6, 2016

Allen Roses, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, has passed away at age 73.


image: When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

By | October 3, 2016

Winners in the Physiology or Medicine category are trending older, even though they’re completing their award-winning research when they are about the same age, according to an analysis.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>An Essay on Science and Narcissism</em>

Book Excerpt from An Essay on Science and Narcissism

By | October 1, 2016

In Chapter 3, "Determining Narcissism in Science with Real-Life Examples," author Bruno Lemaitre considers Niels Jerne.


image: Church on the Late Show

Church on the Late Show

By | October 1, 2016

Harvard biologist George Church talks gene therapy, aging, and reviving the woolly mammoth with Stephen Colbert.


image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.


image: Curious George

Curious George

By | October 1, 2016

George Church has consistently positioned himself at genomics’ leading edge.

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image: Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

By | October 1, 2016

Companies focused on developing treatments for dogs, cats, and horses are bringing a diverse array of products to the pet medicine market.


image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.


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