The Scientist

» hospital-acquired infections and ecology

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image: Population Ecologist Dies

Population Ecologist Dies

By | May 18, 2016

Ilkka Hanski of the University of Helsinki has passed away at age 63.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Copper Stopper

Copper Stopper

By | May 1, 2016

This research found that coating hospital surfaces with copper helped battle microbes and the infections they spread.

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?

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image: Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

By | May 1, 2016

Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 

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image: Serious Putty

Serious Putty

By | May 1, 2016

A naturally occurring clay, used in traditional Native American medicine, shows promise as an antibiotic.

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image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

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image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

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