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image: Lizard Secretes Heat

Lizard Secretes Heat

By | January 25, 2016

Researchers confirm the unprecedented endothermic abilities of a South American reptile.

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image: Taking a Dino’s Temperature

Taking a Dino’s Temperature

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers develop a method for estimating the body temperatures of long-extinct species, and suggest that dinosaurs operated somewhere between endothermy and exothermy.

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image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

2 Comments

image: Dinos Not Necessarily Cold-Blooded

Dinos Not Necessarily Cold-Blooded

By | June 27, 2012

The leading argument for dinosaurs being cold-blooded is overturned as a nearly identical bone structure is found in mammals.

5 Comments

image: Warm-Blooded Dinos?

Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

3 Comments

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