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» ribosomes and developmental biology

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

By | July 29, 2015

Scientists build a specialized ribosome with linked subunits that can translate designer transcripts in bacteria.

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image: AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

By | July 24, 2015

Multiple consecutive adenosine nucleotides can cause protein translation machinery to stall on messenger RNAs.

2 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2015

February 2015's selection of notable quotes

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