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image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.

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image: Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

By | October 1, 2016

Newly developed techniques from four different groups rely on the same basic steps to track translation in live cells.

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image: Finding Mislabeled Noncoding RNAs

Finding Mislabeled Noncoding RNAs

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers scour the genome for micropeptides encoded within RNAs presumed to function in a noncoding capacity.

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image: Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2016

Bits of the transcriptome once believed to function as RNA molecules are in fact translated into small proteins.

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image: Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

By | July 29, 2015

Scientists build a specialized ribosome with linked subunits that can translate designer transcripts in bacteria.

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image: AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

By | July 24, 2015

Multiple consecutive adenosine nucleotides can cause protein translation machinery to stall on messenger RNAs.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2015

February 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Neurodegeneration and Protein Translation Linked

Neurodegeneration and Protein Translation Linked

By | July 24, 2014

Researchers find that a type of neurodegeneration in mice is linked to ribosomal stalling during protein translation in the brain.

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image: Palade Particles, 1955

Palade Particles, 1955

By | February 1, 2014

Electron microscopy led to the first identification of what would later be known as ribosomes.

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image: Palade and His Particles

Palade and His Particles

By | February 1, 2014

Nobel Laureate Christian de Duve discusses the impact of George Palade’s work on ribosomes.

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