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image: Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

By | November 25, 2015

A panel of experts advised the US Food and Drug Administration that BioMarin Pharmaceutical has not demonstrated efficacy of its new drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Battling the Bulge

Battling the Bulge

By | November 1, 2015

Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Following FDA OK, 23andMe to Expand Health Prediction

Following FDA OK, 23andMe to Expand Health Prediction

By | October 21, 2015

The personal genomics firm is ramping up its suite of disease-related genetic tests.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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