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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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Federal regulators also revoked a certificate for the company’s Newark, California lab.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Zika and Dengue Immunity: A Complex Relationship

Zika and Dengue Immunity: A Complex Relationship

By | June 28, 2016

Researchers examine the blood of people infected with dengue virus, finding a few Zika-neutralizing antibodies among mostly enhancing ones.

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image: Sex Differences in Immune Response

Sex Differences in Immune Response

By | June 21, 2016

Female mice lacking an immune receptor are better than males at fighting certain viral infections.

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The change should allow patients with fatal illnesses easier access to experimental drugs, but gaining permission from drug companies remains the biggest challenge.

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