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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Dangerous Research Regs Released

Dangerous Research Regs Released

By | September 25, 2014

The US government releases its policy on so-called dual-use research involving dangerous pathogens that could be used for biological terrorist attacks.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Sex and Drugs

Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

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image: That Loving Feeling

That Loving Feeling

By | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

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image: FDA Issues Nanotechnology Guidance

FDA Issues Nanotechnology Guidance

By | June 26, 2014

Four new documents from the US Food and Drug Administration provide industry with guidelines on the use of nanotechnology in products regulated by the agency.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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