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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Another Drug Price Hike

Another Drug Price Hike

By | March 28, 2016

Valeant Pharmaceuticals is criticized for jacking up the price of a drug used in assisted suicide.

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Getting Animal Research Right

Getting Animal Research Right

By | March 1, 2016

Regulatory and compliance expectations for animal-based research are demanding, while public and political scrutiny of animal research is rising.

2 Comments

image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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