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image: Cellular Cartography

Cellular Cartography

By | October 18, 2016

Researchers launch an initiative to generate a complete atlas of all cells in the human body.

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image: Toggling CRISPR Activity with a Chemical Switch

Toggling CRISPR Activity with a Chemical Switch

By | September 12, 2016

Researchers design a Cas9 enzyme that cuts DNA only in the presence of particular drug.

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image: A Blood Test To Determine When Antibiotics Are Warranted

A Blood Test To Determine When Antibiotics Are Warranted

By | July 7, 2016

Scientists can assay gene activity to distinguish between bacterial and viral infections.

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image: Genes Expressed After Death

Genes Expressed After Death

By | June 23, 2016

Understanding postmortem gene expression could help researchers improve organ transplants and time-of-death estimates, according to studies on mice and zebrafish.

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Another study finds similar gene expression in the brains of people with these disorders.

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image: New Epigenetic Mark Confirmed in Mammals

New Epigenetic Mark Confirmed in Mammals

By | April 1, 2016

Methylation on adenine bases is involved in the dampening of gene expression in mammalian cells, according to a study.

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image: CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

By | March 10, 2016

A variation of the gene-editing technique can more precisely and efficiently downregulate the expression of target genes than traditional CRISPR/Cas9.

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image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.

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image: Fearless about Folding

Fearless about Folding

By | January 1, 2016

Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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