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» BRCA2 and evolution

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2012

January 2012's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Magnetic Swimmers Cultured

Magnetic Swimmers Cultured

By | December 22, 2011

For the first time, researchers culture a bacteria that uses a magnetic sulfide compound to navigate.

3 Comments

image: A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

By | December 22, 2011

Mutations known to increase the risk of developing ovarian and breast cancer may also make carriers susceptible to heart failure.

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image: The Evolution of Drug Resistance

The Evolution of Drug Resistance

By | December 18, 2011

Researchers use whole-genome sequencing to keep tabs on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

9 Comments

image: Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace

Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace

By | December 13, 2011

19th century shipping records defy the claim that Charles Darwin stole some of Alfred Russel Wallace's ideas to craft his theory of evolution.

9 Comments

image: Mom’s Versus Dad’s BRCA

Mom’s Versus Dad’s BRCA

By | December 13, 2011

The age at which BRCA carriers are diagnosed with breast cancer may depend on which parent contributed the mutation.

9 Comments

image: Why People Lost Their Fur

Why People Lost Their Fur

By | December 12, 2011

The need for ancient humans to keep cool during the day might explain their lack of body hair but not why they walked on two feet.

69 Comments

image: Brain Evolution at a Distance

Brain Evolution at a Distance

By | December 6, 2011

Gene expression controlled from afar may have spurred the spurt in brain evolution that led to modern humans.

1 Comment

image: Top 7 in Ecology

Top 7 in Ecology

By | December 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

By | December 5, 2011

Antibiotic resistant bacteria keep their protective genes, even when antibiotics are no longer given.

0 Comments

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