The Scientist

» lung cancer and developmental biology

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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Catalyzing Lung Cancer Research

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013 Scientist to Watch Emily Scott explains her work on a lung enzyme that interacts with nicotine and may serve as a drug target.

1 Comment

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Is Cannabis Really That Bad?

Is Cannabis Really That Bad?

By | January 23, 2013

Though some studies point to negative consequences of pot use in adolescents, data on marijuana’s dangers are mixed.

34 Comments

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2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 13, 2012

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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