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image: Karmella Haynes - Artist

Karmella Haynes - Artist

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's Scientist to Watch is also an accomplished painter.

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image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

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image: Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

By | December 1, 2013

How to prepare your lab for natural disasters and cope with unavoidable consequences

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image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

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image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

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image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

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image: Don’t Fear DIYbio

Don’t Fear DIYbio

By | November 19, 2013

Biological tinkerers are not the risk that some have made them out to be, according to a new report.

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image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

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image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code

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