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» Darwin and developmental biology

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image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

21 Comments

image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

image: Repeated Regeneration

Repeated Regeneration

By | July 12, 2011

A 16-year-long newt study finds that regeneration remains efficient with repetition and age.

9 Comments

image: Top 7 in Developmental Biology

Top 7 in Developmental Biology

By | July 12, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in developmental biology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000.

3 Comments

image: Cellular Salve

Cellular Salve

By | July 8, 2011

Ivan Martin talks about the promise of using cell-based therapies to regenerate joint cartilage.

3 Comments

image: Digit ratio predicts penis length

Digit ratio predicts penis length

By | July 5, 2011

In addition to its relationship to a variety of diseases, the length ratio of the second and fourth fingers also correlates with stretched penile length in men.

24 Comments

image: Darwin Goes Digital

Darwin Goes Digital

By | June 24, 2011

Much of Charles Darwin’s personal library–both his books and what he wrote within them--is now available online.

6 Comments

image: The Axis of Aging

The Axis of Aging

By | June 14, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

0 Comments

image: Fighting to exist

Fighting to exist

By | June 14, 2011

The more closely related two species are, the more they're apt to drive one another to extinction.

24 Comments

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