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image: ALS Drug Access Debated

ALS Drug Access Debated

By | April 7, 2015

Biotech company Genervon has requested accelerated approval for its experimental ALS drug after a small but promising Phase 2 trial. Patients advocate for its acceptance, while researchers urge caution.


image: Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

By | April 2, 2015

Most forecasting methods used to predict the extent of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa overestimated the epidemic’s reach, an updated analysis shows.


image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: Professional Marksman

Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.


image: The CAR T-Cell Race

The CAR T-Cell Race

By | April 1, 2015

Tumor-targeting T-cell therapies are generating remarkable remissions in hard-to-beat cancers—and attracting millions of dollars of investment along the way.

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.


image: My Mighty Mouse

My Mighty Mouse

By | April 1, 2015

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

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