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image: Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

By | February 15, 2017

The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

By | January 9, 2017

A report finds that new medications still take about 12 years to go from patent to patient.

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image: Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

By | January 1, 2017

An entire industry has sprung up around resurrecting failed drugs and recycling existing compounds for novel indications.

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image: Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

By | January 1, 2017

Novel uses for existing and failed drugs may save companies time and money in bringing new therapeutics to market.

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image: More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

By | December 29, 2016

The latest CRISPR deactivators to be discovered turn off the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 widely used in genome editing.

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image: Life Science Controversies of 2016

Life Science Controversies of 2016

By , , and | December 23, 2016

This year, the developers of CRISPR gene-editing technology argued over patent rights, a researcher fought to unmask anonymous PubPeer commenters, US regulators considered “three-parent” babies, and troubles continued for Theranos.

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