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image: So You Think About Dance?

So You Think About Dance?

By | March 30, 2012

Spectators experience some of the same brain impulses as the dancers they're watching.

2 Comments

image: A Beautiful Mind

A Beautiful Mind

By | March 29, 2012

The human brain is an organized, 3D grid composed of elegant, ribbon-like fibers.

6 Comments

image: McKnight Neuroscientist Dies

McKnight Neuroscientist Dies

By | March 26, 2012

William Luttge, the founding executive director of the McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Florida, passes away.

0 Comments

image: Nervy Production

Nervy Production

By | March 23, 2012

A new play about the father of modern neuroscience explores the many facets of Santiago Ramón y Cajal's work, personality, and life.

0 Comments

image: Prometheus Patents Overturned

Prometheus Patents Overturned

By | March 20, 2012

The US Supreme Court ruled that two dose calibration methods from biotech company Prometheus Laboratories cannot be patented.

12 Comments

image: Cerebral Beauty

Cerebral Beauty

By | March 15, 2012

Cap off your celebration of Brain Awareness Week with some artistic applications of neuroscience.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On the Gene Patent Debate

Opinion: On the Gene Patent Debate

By | March 7, 2012

Two key patent cases that no doubt will impact the future of personalized medicine are pending review by the US Supreme Court. What will the Court decide?

18 Comments

image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Alzheimer's Drugs Harmful?

Alzheimer's Drugs Harmful?

By | February 20, 2012

The researcher who helped develop an Alzheimer's treatment now in clinical trials warns that the compound may actually impair memory.

2 Comments

image: Signs of Neuro-problems?

Signs of Neuro-problems?

By | February 17, 2012

The likelihood of developing dementia later in life may be predicted by the speed at which people walk, while grip strength may predict stroke.

2 Comments

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences