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image: New Developments in CRISPR Patent Case

New Developments in CRISPR Patent Case

By | December 12, 2016

Documents suggest Feng Zhang started working on CRISPR before Jennifer Doudna’s group published; researchers call for CRISPR technology to be shared openly

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

By | December 8, 2016

Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.

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image: CRISPR Oral Arguments Recap, Cont’d

CRISPR Oral Arguments Recap, Cont’d

By | December 8, 2016

This week’s CRISPR patent hearing took a deep dive into the science of moving the gene-editing technology from prokaryotes to eukaryotic systems.

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image: USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

By | December 5, 2016

Tuesday morning, the US Patent and Trademark Office will hear oral arguments from the two parties that claim to have been the first to use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology in eukaryotic cells.

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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