Advertisement

The Scientist

» patent and immunology

Most Recent

image: Academics Win Patent Rights

Academics Win Patent Rights

By | April 10, 2012

A judge says that government and university labs have to share the patent rights to the successful cancer drug Velcade.

4 Comments

image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

image: Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

By | April 2, 2012

Vaccination via tiny microneedles elicits a powerful immune response in the skin.

8 Comments

image: Let Them Eat Dirt

Let Them Eat Dirt

By | March 22, 2012

Early exposure to microbes shapes the mammalian immune system by subduing inflammatory T cells.

28 Comments

image: Prometheus Patents Overturned

Prometheus Patents Overturned

By | March 20, 2012

The US Supreme Court ruled that two dose calibration methods from biotech company Prometheus Laboratories cannot be patented.

12 Comments

image: Immune Role in Brain Disorder?

Immune Role in Brain Disorder?

By | March 19, 2012

Replacing immune cells in a mouse model of Rett syndrome, a developmental brain disorder, improved symptoms, suggesting a new target for treatment.

2 Comments

image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: On the Gene Patent Debate

Opinion: On the Gene Patent Debate

By | March 7, 2012

Two key patent cases that no doubt will impact the future of personalized medicine are pending review by the US Supreme Court. What will the Court decide?

18 Comments

image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

0 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
Mettler Toledo
Mettler Toledo

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews