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image: Week in Review: August 29–September 2

Week in Review: August 29–September 2

By | September 2, 2016

Roger Tsien dies; the CRISPR patent dispute you’ve never heard of; immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s; Tasmanian devils developing resistance to transmissible cancer

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Promoting Protein Partnerships

Promoting Protein Partnerships

By | September 1, 2016

Scientists generate new protein-protein interactions at an impressive PACE.

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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

By | August 31, 2016

The Broad Institute and Rockefeller University disagree over which scientists should be named as inventors on certain patents involving the gene-editing technology.

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A patent dispute over CRISPR highlights the need for scientists to agree on IP ownership early.

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