The Scientist

» patent and culture

Most Recent

image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

0 Comments

image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Ruffled Feathers over a Viral Patent

Ruffled Feathers over a Viral Patent

By | May 30, 2013

The researchers who first identified a novel coronavirus say they have shared the virus freely.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Supreme Court Sides with Monsanto

Supreme Court Sides with Monsanto

By | May 15, 2013

The justices unanimously upheld Monsanto’s patent rights on Roundup Ready seeds.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS