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image: That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

By | August 31, 2016

The Broad Institute and Rockefeller University disagree over which scientists should be named as inventors on certain patents involving the gene-editing technology.

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A patent dispute over CRISPR highlights the need for scientists to agree on IP ownership early.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Student Alleges His Team Didn’t Earn CRISPR Patent

Student Alleges His Team Didn’t Earn CRISPR Patent

By | August 18, 2016

A former researcher at the Broad Institute has suggested the University of California, Berkeley, team deserves credit for inventing the gene-editing technique.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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