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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: New CRISPR Patent Issued

New CRISPR Patent Issued

By | February 18, 2016

Caribou Biosciences receives a patent related to the gene-editing technology.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

By | January 21, 2016

Human monoclonal antibodies induced during Ebola infection are able to neutralize related viral species, scientists show. 

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