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image: Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

By | February 15, 2017

The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

By | January 9, 2017

A report finds that new medications still take about 12 years to go from patent to patient.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

By | January 1, 2017

An entire industry has sprung up around resurrecting failed drugs and recycling existing compounds for novel indications.

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