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image: Ruffled Feathers over a Viral Patent

Ruffled Feathers over a Viral Patent

By | May 30, 2013

The researchers who first identified a novel coronavirus say they have shared the virus freely.

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image: Supreme Court Sides with Monsanto

Supreme Court Sides with Monsanto

By | May 15, 2013

The justices unanimously upheld Monsanto’s patent rights on Roundup Ready seeds.

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image: Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

By | May 14, 2013

Researchers track DNA modifications and gene expression in stem cells as they differentiate.

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image: Supreme Court Considers Gene Patents

Supreme Court Considers Gene Patents

By | April 16, 2013

A decision will not be reached until later in the year, but the United States’ top justices appear to be inclined to rule against the validity of patenting human genes.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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