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image: Marriages of Opportunity

Marriages of Opportunity

By | February 1, 2016

New ideas for antibody-drug conjugate design

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

5 Comments

image: “Heroes of CRISPR” Disputed

“Heroes of CRISPR” Disputed

By | January 19, 2016

Critics have harsh words for the Broad Institute’s Eric Lander and Cell over a recent perspective piece describing the history of CRISPR.

10 Comments

image: Who Owns CRISPR, Cont’d

Who Owns CRISPR, Cont’d

By | January 14, 2016

The US Patent and Trademark Office declares a patent “interference” and will seek to determine who has rights to the gene-editing technology.

1 Comment

image: Disease-Linked Genes Questioned

Disease-Linked Genes Questioned

By | January 6, 2016

Many patients with genetic variations linked to cardiac disorders do not exhibit any symptoms, raising concerns about the validity of incidental findings of genetic tests.

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image: TS Picks: CRISPR Patent Edition

TS Picks: CRISPR Patent Edition

By | January 5, 2016

A challenge to the first CRISPR patent just got teeth.

3 Comments

image: Updating the Polio Vaccine

Updating the Polio Vaccine

By | January 4, 2016

Researchers develop new attenuated viruses that could support the eradication effort.

1 Comment

image: Pluripotency Bots

Pluripotency Bots

By | January 1, 2016

A tour of efforts to automate the production and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells

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image: Picking Up the Pace

Picking Up the Pace

By | January 1, 2016

FDA designations promise to expedite the approval of drugs for conditions ranging from infectious disease to cancer.

0 Comments

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