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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

Drug Approval Timeline Same as 20 Years Ago

By | January 9, 2017

A report finds that new medications still take about 12 years to go from patent to patient.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

By | January 1, 2017

An entire industry has sprung up around resurrecting failed drugs and recycling existing compounds for novel indications.

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image: Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

By | January 1, 2017

Novel uses for existing and failed drugs may save companies time and money in bringing new therapeutics to market.

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