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image: CRISPR Oral Arguments Recap, Cont’d

CRISPR Oral Arguments Recap, Cont’d

By | December 8, 2016

This week’s CRISPR patent hearing took a deep dive into the science of moving the gene-editing technology from prokaryotes to eukaryotic systems.

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image: A Tale of Two Tails

A Tale of Two Tails

By | December 7, 2016

An analysis of ancient fish fossils suggests that mammalian and fish tails are fundamentally different structures, each with unique evolutionary histories.

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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image: USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

By | December 5, 2016

Tuesday morning, the US Patent and Trademark Office will hear oral arguments from the two parties that claim to have been the first to use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology in eukaryotic cells.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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