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Epitomics
Epitomics

The Scientist

» patent, evolution and immunology

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image: Year of the Fetus

Year of the Fetus

By | December 18, 2012

2012 saw the birth of a handful of non-invasive genetic prenatal tests, but the young industry faces growing pains as legal and ethical questions loom. 

2 Comments

image: Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

By | December 12, 2012

Fat cells behave differently in obese individuals, causing inflammation and insulin resitance.

1 Comment

image: Single Patent for EU

Single Patent for EU

By | December 12, 2012

After decades of political wrangling, the European Union is poised to introduce a single patent system to reduce red tape and application costs for researchers and companies.

1 Comment

image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

By | December 6, 2012

As the United States edges ever closer to the dreaded fiscal cliff, the pharmaceutical industry approaches a precipice of its own.

4 Comments

image: Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

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