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image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: December 9–13

Week in Review: December 9–13

By | December 13, 2013

Animal family tree rearranged; how E. coli evades the immune system; pharmacological chaperones and misfolded proteins

0 Comments

image: The Right to Know—or Not

The Right to Know—or Not

By | December 12, 2013

Consumers, patients, and study participants should be made aware of potential incidental findings, according to a federally-appointed bioethics panel.

0 Comments

image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

3 Comments

image: 23andMe Steps Back

23andMe Steps Back

By | December 6, 2013

The company announces that it will stop offering health interpretations of personal genetic data.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

0 Comments

image: Stinky Cheese

Stinky Cheese

By | December 2, 2013

Researchers collaborate to create fermented food products using microbes harvested from some malodorous parts of the human body.

0 Comments

image: An Open Invitation

An Open Invitation

By | December 1, 2013

On creating communal, equitable discourse to broaden participation in genetics research

3 Comments

image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

0 Comments

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