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image: Death Match

Death Match

By | October 1, 2012

Cockfighting and other cultural practices in Southeast Asia could greatly aid the spread of deadly diseases like bird flu.

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image: Live-Action Networks

Live-Action Networks

By | October 1, 2012

Mass spec plus novel software equals dynamic views into the chemical lives of microbes.


image: The Epigenetic Lnc

The Epigenetic Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Long non-protein-coding RNA (lncRNA) sequences are often transcribed from the opposite, or antisense, strand of a protein coding gene. In the past few years, research has shown that these lncRNAs play a number of regulatory roles in the cell. For exa


image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.


image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.


image: Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

By | September 28, 2012

The microbiome of the lung is different in patients with the disease, which causes a thick buildup of mucus that makes breathing difficult.


image: BGI Saves Genomics Technology

BGI Saves Genomics Technology

By | September 26, 2012

A large Chinese sequencing center’s purchase of Complete Genomics, a California-based DNA services company, ensures the valued technology will remain on the market.


image: Outbreak Watch

Outbreak Watch

By | September 26, 2012

International health officials are monitoring a new respiratory virus that has killed one person and left another in critical condition.

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image: Forensic Law Turns to Epigenetics

Forensic Law Turns to Epigenetics

By | September 25, 2012

Privacy advocates are arguing that collecting genetic data upon arrest is an invasion of privacy, given recent evidence that 80 percent of the human genome is functional.


image: Surprise XMRV Retraction

Surprise XMRV Retraction

By | September 21, 2012

The journal PLOS Pathogens abruptly retracts the seminal paper linking XMRV to disease.


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