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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson’s and celiac.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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Octopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process. 

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image: Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

By | April 5, 2017

Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: CRISPR Screen Detects Functional Gene Regulation

CRISPR Screen Detects Functional Gene Regulation

By | April 3, 2017

A CRISPR-Cas9–based method probes the regulatory roles of noncoding DNA sequences.

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