The Scientist

» turkey, evolution and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace

Darwin Didn't Plagiarize Wallace

By | December 13, 2011

19th century shipping records defy the claim that Charles Darwin stole some of Alfred Russel Wallace's ideas to craft his theory of evolution.

9 Comments

image: Why People Lost Their Fur

Why People Lost Their Fur

By | December 12, 2011

The need for ancient humans to keep cool during the day might explain their lack of body hair but not why they walked on two feet.

69 Comments

image: Brain Evolution at a Distance

Brain Evolution at a Distance

By | December 6, 2011

Gene expression controlled from afar may have spurred the spurt in brain evolution that led to modern humans.

1 Comment

image: Top 7 in Ecology

Top 7 in Ecology

By | December 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

By | December 5, 2011

Antibiotic resistant bacteria keep their protective genes, even when antibiotics are no longer given.

0 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  2. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Advertisement
The Scientist