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image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: Waking Cancer Cells

Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

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image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

By | November 25, 2012

Three-dimensional genome maps are leading to a deeper understanding of how the genome’s form influences its function.

4 Comments

image: Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

By | November 20, 2012

A transplant of cells from the lining of the nose helps dogs with spinal injuries walk again.

1 Comment

image: A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

By | November 15, 2012

Misfolded α-synuclein proteins promote the spread of Parkinson’s pathology in mouse brains.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Ear-Powered Batteries

Next Generation: Ear-Powered Batteries

By | November 11, 2012

Researchers use the electric potential of a guinea pig’s inner ear to harvest enough energy to run a tiny sensor.

1 Comment

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