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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: Waking Cancer Cells

Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

0 Comments

image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

By | November 25, 2012

Three-dimensional genome maps are leading to a deeper understanding of how the genome’s form influences its function.

4 Comments

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

By | November 20, 2012

A transplant of cells from the lining of the nose helps dogs with spinal injuries walk again.

1 Comment

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

By | November 15, 2012

Misfolded α-synuclein proteins promote the spread of Parkinson’s pathology in mouse brains.

1 Comment

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