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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Picking Out Patterns

Picking Out Patterns

By | May 1, 2017

Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.

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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell's protein-degrading machine

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: New Giant Virus Group Reported

New Giant Virus Group Reported

By | April 6, 2017

A genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. 

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