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image: Specialized Neurons Encode Social Learning in Humans

Specialized Neurons Encode Social Learning in Humans

By | September 6, 2016

Activity in the anterior cingulate cortex corresponds with observing the behavior of others when their actions, or the subsequent outcomes, don’t match one’s expectation.

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image: Environmental Magnetite in the Human Brain

Environmental Magnetite in the Human Brain

By | September 6, 2016

Mineral nanoparticles similar to those that have been associated with Alzheimer’s disease may enter the brain through the inhalation of polluted air.

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image: The History of Optogenetics Revised

The History of Optogenetics Revised

By | September 1, 2016

Credit for the neuroscience technique has largely overlooked the researcher who first demonstrated the method.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

By | September 1, 2016

Drosophila antennae let the insects seek out moisture levels they like best.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

By | September 1, 2016

Neuropsychologist Simon Thompson found a possible link between yawning and multiple sclerosis. So what better way to get under the skin of his research than volunteering to take part in one of his experiments?

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image: Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

By | September 1, 2016

The second visual field may aid in navigation.

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Neurons in the lamprey spinal cord can sense pH and counteract changes from the body’s optimal range.

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