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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: How Stress Affects Cancer’s Spread

How Stress Affects Cancer’s Spread

By | March 1, 2016

A mouse study reveals how chronic stress remodels lymphatic vasculature to facilitate the spread of tumor cells.

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image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

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image: Watching Cancer on the Move

Watching Cancer on the Move

By | December 15, 2015

Fibroblasts help tumors metastasize by paving a “migration highway” through the extracellular matrix, scientists report.

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image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.

4 Comments

image: Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

By | October 27, 2014

Cellular blebs shed by tumor cells can process short stretches of RNA that go on to induce tumor formation in neighboring cells.

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image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

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image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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