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image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

By | April 28, 2016

Along with his recent $250 million donation to cancer research, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker emphasized the importance of data sharing.

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By , and | April 20, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting

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image: Running from Cancer?

Running from Cancer?

By | April 18, 2016

At the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, researchers review the evidence that exercise has antitumor benefits.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Cancer Tissue Repository Launched

Cancer Tissue Repository Launched

By | April 11, 2016

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will store tissue samples from patients with leukemia and lymphoma from which scientists can make patient-derived mouse models.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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