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image: Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

By | December 6, 2015

The popular type 2 diabetes drug may cause profound changes in patients’ microbiomes.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

2 Comments

image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

2 Comments

image: A Complex Disorder

A Complex Disorder

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Factors that likely contribute to obesity include disruptions to intercellular signaling, increased inflammation, and changes to the gut microbiome.  

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