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» extinct species, ecology and microbiology

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image: Haley Oliver: Master of Meat

Haley Oliver: Master of Meat

By | June 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, Purdue University, Age: 32

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image: Parsing Pathogens

Parsing Pathogens

By | June 1, 2014

Meet the peptide-covered microcantilever device capable of differentiating subtypes of Salmonella.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

1 Comment

image: Parsing the Penis Microbiome

Parsing the Penis Microbiome

By | May 29, 2014

Circumcision and sexual activity are but two factors that can influence the bacterial communities that inhabit male genitalia.

5 Comments

image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

2 Comments

image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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image: Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

By | May 19, 2014

The overly simplistic notion of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiome is giving way to an appreciation of diverse and dynamic bacterial communities.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

1 Comment

image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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